IMPORTANT BLOG ANNOUNCEMENT

PLEASE CHANGE YOUR BOOKMARKS AND FEEDS TO THE NEW URL, YANKEEANALYSTS.COM. TYU IS IN NO WAY AFFILIATED WITH THE NEW YORK YANKEES OR YANKEES UNIVERSE.
Jan 202011

The standard 'Joba looking beaten' pic for these posts

Many of us were holding out hope that the Yanks would at least consider letting Joba battle for battle for one of the open rotation spots in spring training, but apparently that’s not the case. Brian Cashman addressed this during the Q&A of yesterday’s Rafael Soriano press conference. Andrew Marchand of ESPN-NY has the report:

GM Brian Cashman and manager Joe Girardi stood united that Joba Chamberlain will be in the bullpen.

Even though Chamberlain’s career starting numbers are better than either Ivan Nova or Sergio Mitre, the Yankees say they will not consider making Chamberlain a starter.

“He’s in the bullpen,” Cashman said.

Chamberlain, barring injuries to Rafael Soriano and Mariano Rivera, will pitch in the fifth, sixth and seventh inning. Chamberlain has gone from season setup savior in 2007 to the Joba Rules back to the eighth inning and now to who knows what. His stock at 25 is at an all-time low and it doesn’t appear he is going to be a vital cog in the near future for the Yankees.

One thing is certainly true if Cashman and Girardi stick to their word, he will never start again for the Yankees.

Once upon a time back in 2008, we all debated the merits of Joba the future Closer vs Joba the mid level starter (Joba the ace-level starter was never debatable). Now, we have no idea who the 4th and 5th starter is, and still the Yanks would rather use him as a back of the bullpen reliever in the 6th/7th inning rather than get 175 inning and 30+ starts out of him. I discussed this yesterday with Mike Francesa, who as many Yankee fans in the NYC area will know has long been a champion of Joba in the bullpen. When asked where Joba would be more valuable, in the 6th or as a starter, even he said “it’s something I can’t argue anymore”. But the Yanks think this is his best usage and will not even look at him in spring training. They’ve clearly made up their minds on the topic.

I can understand the Yanks being down on Joba. When your manager is in better shape than one of your players is, it’s easy to view the glass as half empty and take a ‘show me’ attitude toward a player. Girardi sets a high standard of excellence for all of his players and one look at Joba and you know he’s not meeting it. From the day Joba was drafted, conditioning was one of the red flags attached to him, as well as the ability to maintain his stuff. He was 300 pounds in his early years in college, and 1. 4 mil will buy you a lot of Twinkees. I’ll be interested to see what kind of shape he shows up in this year, but judging by the past two springs I have little reason to believe this year will be any different. This website get a lot of attention last year when I reported a Billy Eppler quote that the debate was over, but at the time even I didn’t think that was etched in stone. Apparently, it is.

13 Responses to “Cash-Joba’s in the bullpen”

  1. I read the reason behind this isn’t his numbers or his weight but the fact that Brian, Girardi and the brain trust don’t think he will ever be able to consistently repeat his delivery and therefore they want him to pitch as little in one outing as possible to cover this flaw.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    Steve S. Reply:

    Right, that’s the questions to being able to maintain his stuff I referred to. I think being in better shape could help, or could at least help his stuff be good enough where it wouldn’t matter.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    T.O. Chris Reply:

    We’ve seen fat pitchers in the past maintain good velocity as starters… whether juice had anything to do with that who knows… I really think with Joba it really comes down to his mental preperations and his ability to trust himself pitching 7 innings in a game effectively, now maybe if he worked out lost some weight and felt better and stronger then that would be the thing he needs to kick the stronger mental side in to gear, it’s at least worth a try.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  2. All of which makes it even more inexplicable that the Yankees were reportedly unwilling to deal Chamberlain last summer as part of the Haren deal. If you don’t believe in the player, why keep him? As his role has diminshed, his market value has lessened, to the point where he could no longer even be a significant trade chip.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The Big City of Dreams Reply:

    I agree there is no reason to keep him if the role he has on the team is insignificant. The kid is a middle reliever but he’s been held onto as if he is Mo circa 96  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  3. his delivery and control improved at the end of the season when he was throwing the breaking stuff and getting it over.
    I think he could succeed as a starter now.
    I would assume he’ll get another shot when he’s a Free agent or maybe Rothschild will have a different viewpoint..  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  4. All fans can do at this point is hope that Joba enjoys good health all season long and is able to showcase a killer FB-Slider combo that will elevate him to the top of relievers’ rankings. GMs around baseball might be willing to look at an effective Joba with kinder eyes and think: “why not turn him into a starter…”  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  5. Joba has big upside but unfortunately a bigger backside.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    Steve S. Reply:

    Hahahaha!  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  6. According to Cashman, his significant loss of velocity when he starts is the main reason he’s not in the rotation. If the Yankees knew what’s good for them, they’d pay for and insist Joba work out with a personal trainer year around… then maybe his velocity would hold up when he started.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    T.O. Chris Reply:

    The Yankees believe that it’s his inability to repeat his delivery that makes his stuff go away but I’m just not sure if I believe that, I believe to some degree this is possibly the case but there also has to be something in Joba’s head about the pen and rotation that are so different he can’t repeat the formula that does him well. His velocity should drop when he goes to the rotation but not from 94-97 to 89-92 like we had seen, I’ve always thought he should be able to maintain a 92-95 MPH fastball as a starter, maybe a personal trainer could help achieve this but I’m just not sure how you can determine if it’s all about delivery as they believe, weight, his mind set or some combo of everything and I guess that’s overall why they have given up on him in the rotation, I believe they would rather get what they can out of him in the pen then try and put in major work to turn him into a starter at this point.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The Big City of Dreams Reply:

    The reason why Cashman’s belief doesn’t hold up is he didn’t have a significant loss in velocity when he first went to the rotation. As a matter of fact he didn’t have problems with his velocity until he got hurt in 2008. There were those 3 games after the break in 2009 and he was throwing hard as a starter.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  7. It may be best for him to focus on a simple approach, like fastball command and slider break, with less pressure. When he masters that, he could move up in the depth chart.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

© 2011 TYU Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha