IMPORTANT BLOG ANNOUNCEMENT

PLEASE CHANGE YOUR BOOKMARKS AND FEEDS TO THE NEW URL, YANKEEANALYSTS.COM. TYU IS IN NO WAY AFFILIATED WITH THE NEW YORK YANKEES OR YANKEES UNIVERSE.

Often, fans see a player that constantly makes the same mistakes and assumes that the player is not trying, or is too stubborn to change his ways. This line of thinking has led many fans to become incredibly frustrated with Joba Chamberlain. After he allowed four of the first five hitters to reach in last night’s game, fans on many of the blogs I frequent were echoing that familiar refrain: “I am really sick of Joba. He is really showing no effort or inclination to get better. He is just stubborn and unwilling to change.” This is a ridiculous fallacy, as we really know very little about what is going on in a player’s head or behind the scenes.

Unless a player is obviously dogging it, it is impossible to discern whether a player is giving his all by watching on television. We can try and interpret the events on the field, but ultimately, we just do not have enough information about the player’s level of preparation, will to improve, or willingness to try new things. Usually, a player who is not performing or is making the same errors repeatedly is trying to change, but cannot execute. Does anyone truly believe that these players are satisfied with failure on the largest stage for baseball in the world? The assumption should be that the players are attempting to avoid failure unless they clearly show otherwise.

This brings me to Joba Chamberlain. He wants to get better, and the notion that he is not trying is not supported by anything but his lack of performance. He is not throwing strikes because he is not confident in his stuff and is afraid of getting hit. We can shout “Just Throw Strikes!!!!” at the television all we want, but it is much easier said than done. He wants to throw strikes, he just does not believe in himself enough at this point to do so. He therefore nibbles at the edges, trying to avoid the fat part of the bat. His shaking off the catcher stems from the same issue. He just does not have confidence in the pitches that the catcher is calling for. This is a less drastic version of the problem Clay Buccholz dealt with for a while, where he was so afraid to throw the next pitch that he would check on the runner at first an inordinate amount of times so as to delay having to come to the plate.

Are these guys not trying to improve? Are they satisfied with their failures? Of course not. It is not a matter of effort for Joba. It is a matter of execution.

14 Responses to “The "This Guy Is Not Trying" Fallacy”

  1. I have been saying all along that he is afraid to throw hard. Lat night was a perfect example he had to be yelled at by Derek Jeter to finally amp it up. I dont get that at all why is he so hesitant to throw the fing ball? When he did he was great-makes sense to me at 91-he sucks at 95 he is good.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The other Chris H Reply:

    Yeah and he has also been told all year by Yankee brass that he is “important” and that he has to be on “Joba Rules” not to hurt himself and this extra stuff revolves around making sure he doesn’t get hurt, I think they have protected him to the point that they have neutered him on the mound as the Baseball tonight guys put it. I also think that Joba is a guy who depends a lot on adrenaline and being pumped up (as seen by the arm pump) and the more intense he is and the more adrenaline he is playing with the more pumped up he gets and the harder he throws (as evidence when he is good late in games he starts to roll) but I just don’t think he can get really excited and pumped up with the combination of one being protected to much and he isn’t happy about all the rules and the fact he doesn’t want to hut himself.

    I think one encouraging thing is we saw that Joba is not dead, after Jeter came out he threw what 4 straight fastballs the first at 94 and the following 3 at 95, so that means the old dominate Joba is still in there somewhere waiting to come out, hopefully the playoffs release his mental block.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  2. Anyone who think Chamberlain is stubborn and thats why he is playing like this needs to stop watching baseball because you don’t know what you are talking about… Wouldn’t you do well so you don’t have to hear BS about you all the time in the paper and on the internet? No one sabotages themselves. He just don’t A want to be hurt again and let the Yankees down and have to rehab an injury and B he because he is afraid of being injured he is trying to throw 92 on the corner and it isn’t working. Eventually he is going to realize (hopefully soon) that in sports in general you can’t play with the fear of being hurt because it’s going to happen you just have to go out and play and hope when it does happen it isn’t that bad.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  3. Did anyone watch the game last night on ESPN? I did just to get a different take on the Yankees and Joba from a ESPN POV but Steve Philips really grinds my gears he spent pretty much the whole night falling all over David Price while completely killing Joba at every turn and and the Yankees for “making a reliever a starter” and he even went so far as to say and I quote “HERE IS A GUY WHO SPENT MOST OF HIS TIME IN THE MINORS COMING OUT OF THE BULL PEN” Which first of all is a complete lie or he just doesn’t know what he is talking about because I am pretty sure Joba never came out of the pen until he got called up…. if you can’t get simple things like that correct and you failed terribly as a GM how can your baseball opinion be respected and be on nation TV???  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    e mills Reply:

    I generally don’t agree with anything ESPN people have to say, however, I think the Yankees should’ve done with Joba what the Rays did with Price (disregarding keeping him in the minors to make sure they can keep him longer) and started Joba off slow and progressively build him up so he’s at or near his peak now going into the playoffs.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The other Chris H Reply:

    I was thinking the same thing last night but I just can’t make myself agree with Steve Phillips he is the least informed person in baseball, there is a reason no one wants him as a GM and he is calling games.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  4. A couple of things: Joba after Jeter spoke with him look like a different and much better pitcher that got the kind of results that I believe show his future. 2nd, ESPN is so off the mark regarding their comments on Joba it is laughable. He has been a starter his whole minor league career that it is embarrassing the lack of knowledge this suggest.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The other Chris H Reply:

    I totally agree with you once Jeter went to the mound and really didn’t pat him on the back like always but more or less kinda kicked him in the butt and said get going (obviously inferring what was done) he sort of let all the getting hurt and Joba rules float away and he started throwing the consistent 94/95 MPH that he should have as a starter he should be 94 and 95 most of the time with some 93s and later in the game and in big situations 96 and 97 that is more than enough velocity to be an ace…. heck that is the amount of Velocity AJ and CC deal with. He just needs a mental kick in the butt sometime and I think the babying and Joba rules do the opposite they sort of coddle him and I don’t think he likes it and I don’t think he can get ramped up as easily.

    Steve Phillips really has always had the impression that the Yankees took a reliever and tried to force Joba to become a starter and there really is nothing further from the truth, he also said a few months ago he didn’t believe Joba wanted to be a starter he wants to be a reliever BS… If he wanted to be a reliever he would never have been made a starter because he wouldn’t have gone along with it and they would have kept him in the 8th. ESPN in general has guys through out it with a concerning lack of knowledge on a subject based off the fact they don’t watch the players they are talking about, but to be doing the Yankee game and say something that false and to talk for 4 innings and then some later about how Joba is a reliever and the Yankees essentially bit the big one on this and how he is being ruined as a starter is really (annoying for one) complete jackassery.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  5. I think the Yankees should start the 2010 season with Joba in Scranton. It’s not a matter of effort, really, it’s just a matter of not being knowledgeable, it seems, to get through a big league lineup (in an efficient and effective manner). He basically skipped Triple-A, so I wouldn’t mind seeing him in there rather than up here. We’ve totally screwed up the kid’s development because we needed an arm in the bullpen in 2007. Let’s not further compound the problem.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The other Chris H Reply:

    I actually agree with you on this one and have stated similar but exact statements before on here, my own problem always is he couldn’t have started in triple A because of the Joba obsession with Yankee fans they would have killed the Yankees for leaving him in triple A in “meaningless games” and then he would have probably come up and been better than has been now and people would have bitched why he hadn’t come up sooner… it was loose loose for management and Joba, but I would rather have corrected his development than appease fans.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    Moshe Mandel Reply:

    I disagree. He zipped through the minors really quickly because his stuff was so dominant, but he was also getting into the 7th and 8th inning every game. He is not going to learn the skills he needs to get through MLB innings in the minors. I also don’t think they botched his development- he was hitting his innings limits in 2007, so they moved him to the bullpen. His development was hurt by his injury last year, which limited his innings and may have sapped his confidence.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The other Chris H Reply:

    He only had a little while in triple A less than a full season that is important mental developmental time as much as the arm and the strength of the stuff… I don’t care how good he was he should have started last year in the minors as a starter and then called him after the break in the rotation and then his arm would have built up for this year and he would know how to handle this part of the season… he has never had to start late in the season with his arm tired and his mind tired.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

    The other Chris H Reply:

    I meant less than a full season in the minors he had less than a half a season in triple A.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

  6. He showed improvement from his his first 3 inning start to his second and he showed improvement in the second and third inning from the second 3 inning start so we have seen some improvement start to start they just haven’t been long enough to see a lot of improvement it’s all small steps here and there.  (Quote)

    [Reply To This Comment]

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

© 2011 TYU Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha